Living the Law of One: A Conventional Viewpoint

The following is from my friend and teacher in this incarnation, Richard Rohr. He is a Catholic priest who is a real prophet. He belongs to the Franciscan Order who follow Jesus through the vision of St. Francis of Assisi. I, myself, have always been Franciscan at heart and love the simplicity, humility, and ability to see Christ—the Logos—in all things. To be a Franciscan at heart is to be countercultural, to serve the marginalized, and make one’s lifestyle and statement of solidarity with the poor in whatever way one feels called to.

The prophetic role does not mean seeing into the future in a paranormal way. It is a sacred role, and very difficult, because it is a vocation of tension. A prophet is called to stand on the “edge of the inside” and call out the shadows of whatever group or movement or culture (usually all three) because those in the center most often can’t see any shadow at all. Richard Rohr plays out the prophetic role with religion, Christianity, Catholicism, and Western culture.

In his daily meditation today, he describes the indwelling presence of the divine. His language is conventional but his vision is cosmic.

———-

Taken from: https://cac.org/naturally-indwelling-2020-01-10/

Naturally Indwelling
Friday, January 10, 2020

Those who have gone to their own depths through contemplation uncover an indwelling Presence. Austrian philosopher Martin Buber (1878–1965) called this intimacy an “I-thou” relationship. It is a deep and loving “yes” to God and to life that is inherent within each of us. In Christian theology, this Presence would be described as the Indwelling Holy Spirit, which is precisely God as immanent, within us, and our deepest and truest self. God is the very ground of our being!

Some saints and mystics have described this Presence as “closer to me than I am to myself” or “more me than I am myself.” Thomas Merton and others call it the True Self. The paradox is that this True Self is immortal and indestructible, and yet it must also be awakened and chosen. The Holy Spirit is totally given and given equally to all, but it must be consciously received. The Presence needs to be recognized, honored, and drawn upon to become a Living Presence.

We all bear the divine image, but we surrender to God’s likeness in varying degrees and stages. None of us is morally or psychologically perfect or whole (at least I have not met anyone who is), but saints and mystics nevertheless dare to believe that they are ontologically (“in their very being”) whole, and that it is totally a gift from God. It has nothing to do with our own private “me”—with anything we could do to earn or deserve it!

The Holy Spirit is never created by our actions or behavior. It is naturally indwelling, our inner being with God. (In Catholic theology, we called the Holy Spirit “Uncreated Grace.”) Culture and usually even religion teach us to live out of the false or separate self of reputation, self-image, role, possessions, money, appearance, and so on. It is only as these things fail us, and they always do, that the True Self stands revealed and ready to guide us. Some enlightened souls surrender to this truth and presence early, usually by reason of suffering.

The True Self does not teach us compassion as much as it is compassion already. And from this more spacious and grounded place, one naturally connects, empathizes, forgives, and loves just about everything. We are made in love, for love, and unto love, and it is out of this love that we act.

Action doesn’t mean busyness or “do-goodism.” It may not even mean activism, but it does mean serious engagement with the suffering of the world, beyond our own in-groups and identity groups. Rightly sought, action and contemplation will always regulate, balance, and convert one another. Separately, they are dead-ended and trapped in personality. For all of us, finding tangible ways of expressing our faith is an endless rhythmic dance. The steps change now and then, but Someone Else is always leading and it’s just up to us to “follow” along.

5 thoughts on “Living the Law of One: A Conventional Viewpoint

  1. Reblogged this on Blue Dragon Journal and commented:
    In case any of my readers are wondering, I do NOT consider myself a Christian. I am open to the Holy Spirit… which I identify as the Mother God. And the Christ Consciousness which as the Holy Child lives within… guided by both Father/Mother God.

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  2. Profound Essential Being Wisdom! The Compassion is /was always there within – forever waiting for connection – our contemplation, meditation. Universal – the same for all Beings. No matter what faith is chosen – we are already chosen. 

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  3. Just as you describe is what I experienced in these last 8 years when all else seemed to fail me. This path unbeknownst to me at the beginning brought me to that point of my true self. A soul made and loved by God having this momentary gift, flesh journey/ experience. God’s grand design LOVE, I embrace more than ever now. We must try and slow down and love and cherish all God has allowed us and given us. Glad I found your blog. God Bless!

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